What Young People Need To Know About Humility

It is a conceit of the young to believe that because something has occurred to them, it is a novel idea, one unknown to previous, plodding generations. This tendency cuts across the board and includes young Christians.

And then they read the classical philosophers… the Church Fathers… the Protestant Reformers… the Enlightenment thinkers… Alexis de Tocqueville and Edmund Burke and The Federalist Papers and Blackstone… Carl F.H. Henry and Herbert Schlossberg and Thomas Oden and Christopher Lasch and Abraham Kuyper and Os Guinness… and biblical exegeses and commentators and historians and scientists whose exacting and exhaustive study open up new vistas of knowledge… and have conversations with serious people who, having reached the age of 40, are a bit more tempered in their approach to life and learning… and real maturity begins.

These comments are more than a bit autobiographical. As a young man (an increasingly distant state of being), my intellectual self-confidence spilled joyously into intellectual pomposity. My mind was a grand world, comprehensive and integrated and satisfied, capable of taking on all comers and informing them of their rightness, wrongness, or simple stupidity.
I am no longer young. Although there are aspects of my youth I miss (supple knees, for example), one I consider with some grief and embarrassment is the intellectual pride I wore as a badge of honor. It was, in reality, a bludgeon of ignorance and injury.

It is good for young people to have strong views, to foster a muscular curiosity, to have opinions of sufficient iron as to sharpen those of their peers. And there’s nothing like the invigoration of intellectual discovery, to grasp something difficult and understand it for the first time, to internalize a great truth or work through a knotty philosophical or theological problem. These things make one feel alive and construct the very lens through which one views life itself.
Yet in our time, the advent of the internet has enabled myriad bright young people, including bright young Christians, to opine with both dogmatism and profligacy. Had the Internet been around when I was in my 20s, no doubt I would have been one of the blogosphere’s chief users – and offenders.
All Christians can rejoice in the many young believers who are writing so thoughtfully and with such art and frequency. Many young men and women I know are using the web to advance critically important arguments in fresh and clever ways.
Christian faith is blessed by young men and women like these. Older Christians should rejoice that the Lord is raising them up and be sufficiently humble to learn from them. Holding younger Christians in contempt simply because they are young is expressly forbidden by the Word of God (I Timothy 4:12). Such contempt is as much a form of pride as any other kind. Like the corpse of dead Lazarus, it stinks.
My caution is only that in an era when so much is at stake in our culture, and when so many young Christians have been cruelly wounded by the brokenness of their families and the excesses of past sin, younger believers not forget that although their voices are new, the truths they proclaim and issues with which they wrestle are not.
Humility and servanthood are terms I dislike, because I’m so bad at applying them to my own life. Yet one’s utility to the Prince of Life is only as extensive as one’s humility and servant attitude. This does not mean that we cannot be confident in proclaiming the truth; rather, it means we bear always in mind that the truth is His, not ours, and that the ministries we occupy are for Jesus’s sake, not our own.
Charles Spurgeon wrote of his own pride that “it is a miserable, wretched affair.” This echoes in the very heart of my own heart. It should for all Christ-followers. Young, middle-aged, or old, let’s remember that intellectual pride is rank in the nostrils of God, and keep remembering that until the day we see our Redeemer, One Who though existing in the very form of God humbled Himself to the point of dying on an instrument of debasement and cruelty, a wooden cross.
If we want to be worthy servants of the King, whether we are emerging or retiring, let’s begin at, and keep returning to, these eternal truths.
Advertisements

Are We Over- Protecting Our Children?

This post was first posted on Breakpoint.

Maybe you’ve heard that phrase “killing them with kindness”? According to some, that may be what our culture is doing to today’s college students, at least psychologically.

Peter Gray, a research professor at Boston College, sees what he calls “declining student resilience.” At one major university, “emergency calls to counseling had more than doubled over the past five years. Students are increasingly seeking help for, and apparently having emotional crises over, problems of everyday life.”

Gray said that one student felt traumatized because her roommate had called her a nasty name. Two others sought counseling because they’d seen a mouse in their off-campus apartment. They called the police, who, he says, “kindly arrived and set a mousetrap for them.” The Atlantic calls this kind of thing “the coddling of the American mind.”

Many of these emotionally stunted students can’t handle a bad grade, and their professors live in fear of negative student reviews or lawsuits. Or as one director of counseling said, “There has been … a decrease in the ability of many young people to manage the everyday bumps in the road of life.”

What’s going on? Dan Jones, the past president of the Association for University and College Counseling Center Directors, points at parents, saying, “[Students] haven’t developed skills in how to soothe themselves, because their parents have solved all their problems and removed the obstacles. They don’t seem to have as much grit as previous generations.”

In other words, there’s been way too much helicopter parenting!

Cameron Cole, a youth pastor in Alabama, knows that overly protecting our kids isn’t biblical. Pain, after all, is part of spiritual growth. “On Jesus’s way to redeeming the world he encountered betrayal, injustice, torture, violence, condemnation, imprisonment, and alienation,” Cole writes. “How deluded I am when I think an alternate path exists for my child’s ‘hoped for’ service to God’s kingdom. He will not wear the crown … unless he bears a cross.”

Too many kids take the easy path, which is the only path they’ve ever known. They’re afraid to fail so they avoid risk at all costs. But our faith teaches us risky obedience to God, knowing He’s in control.

I’m reminded of this point every time I speak with my friend Naghmeh Abedini, the wife of imprisoned pastor Saeed. Jesus said, “I’m with you always.” And let’s not forget, “Nothing shall be impossible.” So let’s share this bracing perspective with our sons and daughters, and live by it.

And let’s not forget that college students in former generations followed this God of the impossible. In 1886, Dwight L. Moody presided over a meeting of 251 college students in Massachusetts. They came from all over the country, and eventually an interest grew in foreign missions. As ChristianHistory.net reports, one of the students, Robert Wilder, organized a meeting for all of those interested in missions, and 21 young people showed up. He later wrote, “Seldom have I seen an audience under the sway of God’s Spirit as it was that night. The delegates withdrew to their rooms or went out under the great trees to wait on God for guidance.”

When the conference was over, 100 students had committed themselves to become overseas missionaries. It was the start of a movement that saw tens of thousands of people carry the gospel around the globe. Is such a passion still conceivable for us?

Yes! But the key is what I learned in my years of teaching teens and college students: Remove the bubble wrap. And like Moody, encourage them toward a God-sized vision for their lives. Help them see their giftedness and how it relates to the needs in their world, so that they can pursue their role in God’s restoration of all things under the lordship of Christ.
And as their leaders, parents, and mentors we need to give them permission to try . . . and room to fail.

Source: Breakpoint

Clarity Makes Your Dreams Become Your Realities

When you are absolutely clear about what you want, you can then think about your goals most of the time. And the more you think about them, the faster they will materialize in your life.

The process of asking yourself questions about your goals in each part of your life begins to clarify your thinking and make you a more focused and better defined person. As Zig Ziglar says, “You move from being a wandering generality to becoming a meaningful specific.”

Most of all, you reach the point where you can determine your major definite purpose in life. This is the springboard for great achievement and extraordinary accomplishment.

Your major definite purpose will be the topic of the next chapter, and how to achieve it will be the subject of the chapters to come.

Adult Is Not A Verb: Helping Young People Spread Their Wings

News around the world.

It’s been called a lot of things: “Peter Pan Syndrome” or my favorite, “failure to launch,” but whatever the term, the phenomenon is undeniable. A record number of young people today are getting stuck in the transition between childhood and adulthood.

Despite attending college in record numbers, millennials seem to struggle to move on to the next phase of life. Just a decade ago, a healthy majority of young adults were able to successfully fledge. Now, those who’ve managed to leave the nest are a minority.

Of course, the recession and a sluggish job market are factors. Millennials do have tougher career prospects than their parents did. But the economy isn’t the only explanation, and the language young people use to talk about adulthood makes that obvious.

Writing in The Wall Street Journal, Nebraska Senator Ben Sasse announced that Twitter had turned the noun “adult” into a verb. “#Adulting” is what kids post on social media to congratulate themselves for the rather ordinary feats of paying the bills, finishing the laundry, or just getting to work on time.

“I adulted!” goes the saying, as if fulfilling daily responsibilities is somehow above and beyond the call of duty. “Adulting” has become so universally recognized that the American Dialect Society nominated it for the most creative word of 2015.

But the Senator’s most important suggestion? Older generations must start investing in the lives of young adults. Summarizing relevant research in 2013, The Boston Globe reported a staggering statistic: Only a quarter of Americans 60 and older had discussed anything important with anyone under 36 in the previous six months! Exclude relatives and that figure dropped to a mortifying 6 percent. How alien this would have sounded to the Apostle Paul, who in Titus 2 urges older men and older women to teach the younger.

Only by connecting and investing in their lives can we reasonably expect our kids, our grandkids, and their peers to understand that “adult” is not something you do. It’s someone you are.

Positive Thinking Versus Positive Knowing

Many people today talk about the importance of “positive thinking.” Positive thinking is important, But It is not enough. Left undetected and uncontrolled, positive thinking can quickly degenerate into positive wishing and positive hoping.

Instead of serving as an energy force for inspiration and higher achievement, positive thinking can become little.more than a generally cheerful attitude towards life and whatever happens to you, positive or negative.

To be focused and effective in goal attainment, positive thinking must translate into “Positive knowing.” You must absolutely know and believe in the depths of your being that you are going to be successful at achieving a particular goal. You must proceed completely without doubt. You must be so resolute and determined, so convinced of you ultimate success, that nothing can stop you.

The Inherent Meditation Of Creativity

Being creative is as innate to being human as eating, talking, walking and thinking is. It has always been a process we naturally prioritize; our ancestors somehow found time to carve their images and stories on cave walls. But we’ve mistakenly grown to regard it as some form of luxury – you’re lucky if you have the means to express yourself.

In reality, it is a manner of education, communication, and ultimately, self-introspection, and we are in constant manifestation of it. The mediums have shifted from rock particles to pixels, but we can all still see that there is something inherently human about wanting to imprint, impress, craft, mold, form, paint, write and otherwise mold something abstract into that which is conceivable to someone else.

Unsurprisingly then, it seems that the most effective creative process is one that follows the art of meditation, mindfulness, intuition, non-resistance, non-judgement, etc.

I did not begin writing because it was something I liked. It was how I figured my way out of pain. It didn’t take too long to realize that I didn’t want to spend my life creating or exacerbating problems only to think and feel my way out for the sake of a job. I wanted to be able to write and create just because. Just because I’m alive and breathing and can.

I had to learn that my expression did not need to be justified – it is valid because I am a valid human being, the same as you, and everybody else.

But in the meantime, I tried all the classic writing routines of the greats, the promised formulas for consistent, rhythmic creation. I tried to be structured, did anything to induce “flow,” intentionally probed at the deep dark untouched corners of myself, was routine even when I didn’t want to be, and found every bit of it to be dead-ended.

I was trying to create structure where structured need not be placed. It did little more than make the process stagnate.

The reason being, mostly, that we do not ebb and flow in and out of creation. It is an unseen constant, from the clothes we choose to the sentences we say to the way we arrange our desks at work.

It comes down to imagining writing (or painting, or singing, or whatever it is you do) as coming as naturally as breathing does: it’s an effortless process, it draws upon what is outside you and transforms it as it goes through you, and it is tensed, stressed, ebbed and made more difficult when we consciously try to do it.

In fact, anything creative tends to be most hampered by end goals. It is almost imperative that you are completely mindful of the moment, creating from a place of simply allowing whatever is going through you to flow out.

Because when you have a pre-prescribed path in mind, it means you are trying to align with somebody else’s. It means that the inspiration you have found is you creating your own version of somebody’s something else that made you tick and flow.

You’ll seldom be inspired by work that is coming from a core truth, and that’s because it shows you something about yourself. Not just something, the truest truth – that’s what makes the process so god damn unbearable.

And that’s why we reach for structure, that’s what makes us stopper the process. That’s why we want inspiration and validation and external support.

In the true essence of real zen, the most creativity can be fostered when you learn to do so without passing judgment: similar to how observing your thoughts and feelings objectively are the path to peace as well.

Some of what you write down you’ll want to share, or make consumable. Some you won’t. That’s okay too. It’s imperative to realize that even the greatest artists weren’t consistently prolific, especially not publicly. But considering that “inactivity” a lack, loss or failure is just attaching another ego-meaning to it all.

You cannot quantify your creativity, and though it is an extension and impression and expression of yourself, it does not define you.

You are free to keep the sacredness of your most inner self only within your own existence. The more you can express that, and live that, without judgment, and in the moment, the more you’ll feel free to be honest, and open up to yourself. The more you feel comfortable with that core self, the more you’ll feel able to create from a peaceful place. Just because. Whenever you want.

Practice Makes Permanent

Good to be back!

You can begin the process of developing courage and eliminating fear by engaging in actions consistent with the behaviours of courage and self- confidence. Anything that you practice over and over eventually becomes a new habit. You develop courage by behaving courageously whenever courage is called for.

Here are some of the activities you can practice to develop the habit of courage. The first and perhaps most important kind of courage is the courage to begin, to launch, to step out in faith. This is the courage to try something new or different, to move out of your comfort zone with no guarantee of success.

Repost: 30 Beautiful Moments In Your Life That You Will Never Forget

By: Rania Naim

1. The moment you faced a longtime fear. There is no greater feeling than doing what you were most afraid of and getting through it.

2. The moment you aced a difficult test. And that awesome feeling you get that you can accomplish anything you put your mind to.

3. The moment you started driving without supervision and played your favorite music the whole way.

4. The moment you got your first salary and how you felt that hard work truly pays off.

5. The moment you made a new friend knowing that you will be friends forever.

6. The moment your crush told you they liked you and how you couldn’t stop smiling.

7. The moment you land in your favorite country and how it breathes new life into you.

8. The moment you rest your head on the pillow after a productive day at work and how it’s bringing you one step close to your goal.

9. The moment your favorite team wins the championship and the euphoria that follows.

10. The moment you hold the baby of someone close to you, and how innocent and soft you become in that moment.

11. The moment you stand up for yourself after being quiet and patient for so long.

12. The moment you get what you’ve been praying for and realizing that the world is not so bad after all.

13. The moment you realize how loved you are by those around you and how supportive they are.

14. The moment that your pet welcomes you home every day as if you are the best thing that ever happened to them.

15. The moment after you’ve had a special conversation with a special someone and immediately feel the growing bond between both of you.

16. The moment you made someone smile after having a terrible day.

17. The moment you let go of someone or something that was holding you back and the liberation that came with it.

18. The moment you make your family happy; whether by being a good student, a good person or just being there for them when they need you.

19. The moment your friends do something sweet for you and remind you of how much they love you.

20. The moment you successfully complete a mission: losing weight, being more focused, being more positive…etc.

21. The moment you are done reading a good book and the inspiration you find in its words.

22. The moment you prove someone who doubted you wrong and the confidence you gain from it. Learning to believe in yourself more often.

23. The moment you master one of the hard yoga poses and the strength you feel after.

24. The moment you decide to be a little bit kinder to yourself and start slowly loving yourself with your imperfections.

25. The moment you receive a heart-felt thank you for touching someone’s life.

26. The moment your favorite song comes on when you have been waiting to hear it all day.

27. The moment you run into an old friend or an acquaintance unexpectedly.

28. The moment you go to the beach after a long time and the serenity you feel from the sound of the waves and the beauty of the sky.

29. The moment you finally understand why something happened to you and finally solving that riddle.

30. The moment of silence when you can truly enjoy your own presence and be grateful for the gift of living no matter how hard or easy your life seems to be.

Should Young Christians Rush to Get Married?

True or False?

Am not into relationship or marriage writing, but this caught my attention and needed to be shared.

For young adult Christians who have grown up believing that sex outside of marriage is wrong, it can be understandable that they might rush to the altar with the person they feel so strongly in love with. It’s no shock to anyone that young people are flooded with feelings and desires that lead them to wanting to be physical with whoever they are attracted to, and when sex is known as a sin unless it’s with a spouse, the rush to get a ring on that finger makes sense.

With a culture that so readily promotes the “happily ever after” path and seems obsessed with the latest pop culture couplings, marriages, divorces, and drama in between, it’s not surprising that many young people would view marriage as the ultimate destination and goal in relationships. Even in the church, marriage is often lauded as the best thing, the highest achievement, the greatest gift, and it can lead young people to feeling like they have to get to that point quickly for their lives, their relationships, and their presence in that community to really matter and have value.

Ethan Renoe recently wrote an article for Relevant asking “ Should So Many Christians Push to Get Married Young? ” and he zeroes in on one famous Bible passage about singleness and marriage: 1 Corinthians 7 . This passage has been often debated, and it raises some important (although controversial) questions.

In verse 8 of that chapter, Paul writes, “Now to the unmarried and the widows I say: It is good for them to stay unmarried, as I do.”
This is a very different stance than what our culture and our churches tend to promote. “But what if Paul was telling the truth?” Renoe asks. “What if it really is better for us to remain single instead of diving headfirst into marriage?”
Wouldn’t that be something?

It’s a helpful and healthy question to ask ourselves, though. As a single woman in her mid-twenties, it’s one I find myself pondering often. The expectation seems to be that I will get meet the man of my dreams someday and then get married shortly thereafter… but I’m not so sure that’s what’s meant for me. I’m definitely in no hurry to get there if that is what the Lord has in store, that’s for sure. As I see more and more friends getting married (even friends quite a few years younger than me, which feels strange), I return to this question, wondering if marriage is really the ultimate good thing we should be striving for, or if Paul was right in encouraging singleness instead.

For the Christians (young or old) who pursue marriage as a way to justify their physical and sexual desires, it seems clear that the focus is misplaced. “As Christians,” Renoe explains, “our primary calling in life is not to gratify our sexual desires first and foremost. It is to glorify God, enjoy Him forever, and bring others into this sphere of blessedness. For this reason, I’ve come to see many of the young marriages of Christians as more of a detriment to the work of the church than a blessing.”

He goes on to say, “what I mean by that is, if we really believe that Jesus, not sex, is the source of our satisfaction, it should affect the way we live our lives. It means perhaps we would spend years of our lives giving to the world in sacrificial and beneficial ways before settling down with our sweetheart to raise children rather than diving into marriage for the wrong reasons.”

Now, this does assume that sex and a desire for physical intimacy is the driving force behind young couples getting married, which isn’t always the case. But he does make a good point that the Lord has great opportunities in store for us in our twenties and thirties when we free ourselves to follow his leading and serve him with our lives, unencumbered by such a serious relationship commitment. It’s not that the desires for intimacy go away, but instead that those who choose to embrace singleness instead redirecting those desires toward Jesus and the work he has for us instead.

We can pursue intimacy in other ways — in our prayer life with the Lord, in our Bible studies and conversations with close friends, in sharing our stories vulnerably with one another, and with sharing common interests and bonding with others around us.

While there have admittedly been times or seasons of my life where I have felt the absence of a meaningful relationship or longed for a husband, there have been many more times where I have been grateful for the freedom that comes with singleness, especially when it comes to service opportunities and ministry work in my church and community.

“We have become blinded by a culture that teaches that the truest source of satisfaction is sex, so it makes sense that many of us would marry young for a taste of that ecstasy,” Renoe writes.

What if we saw our lives instead as something so much greater? What if we saw our singleness as a chance to truly give ourselves to others? What if we saw our free time as a gift from the Lord allowing us to serve the people around us and expand the Kingdom? What if we reprioritized our desires and what is important to us, putting satisfaction in Christ above all else?

Like Renoe concludes, there is no hurry for us to get married. There are so many opportunities before us in the seasons we are in now, and there is so much goodness to be found in a life wholly committed to serving the Lord and others. Pursue him first and foremost, and discover that he, better than any other, can and will fulfill every desire of your heart, no matter your relationship status. The rings can wait.

Credit: Christian Headline

Trending: Love Life Women’s Conference Tampa 2018

Finally it’s here and activated. The love life women’s conference is now live in Tampa Florida. It’s the trending conference for the year 2018, make sure you don’t miss it.

You can also stream online live for all activities. Please visit joycemeyer.com for further information. But meanwhile Sarah James Roberts will be live.

And other great women of God.

Watch the videos below….

Have wonderful Friday and weekend guys..

Why We Should Live Like We’ve Never Been Hurt

Why We Should Live Like We’ve Never Been Hurt

People say love like you’ve never been hurt, but how about we try to live like we’ve never been hurt? Live like life never disappointed us, like pain didn’t change us, like we didn’t grow up or learn, like we are still innocent kids believing that life will turn out exactly the way we want it to. Every now and then let’s live with the naiveté of a 7 year old.

Even if it sounds unrealistic, even if it sounds crazy, even if it sounds impossible, we should try to live like that – even for one day.

We should live like we know we’ll get what we want when we ask for it. Like the universe is our genie granting us anything we wish for. Like the universe is here to spoil us and give us everything we want.

We should live like we never fell off the bike or fell while running. We should run like we are free and we should throw caution to the wind and let our bodies roam the world – unafraid of bruises.

We should speak with no reservations, we shouldn’t be afraid of being vulnerable or throwing tantrums or crying in bed next to our favorite soft toy. We shouldn’t be afraid to feel.
We should live worry-free, like we have all the time in the world to do the things we want and be with the people we love. We shouldn’t worry about the right time or the wrong time or worry about time at all. Life is infinite.

We should say what’s on our minds and in our hearts without calculating or rephrasing or editing. We should speak with no reservations, we shouldn’t be afraid of being vulnerable or throwing tantrums or crying in bed next to our favorite soft toy. We shouldn’t be afraid to feel.

We should quit things we don’t like and stay in bed all morning because we feel like it. We shouldn’t wake up to responsibilities that drain us and a routine that slowly kills us.

We should look forward to our birthdays and throw the biggest and greatest birthday parties. We should get excited about growing up and making our dreams come true. We should get excited about life.

We should believe in romance and fairy-tales, we should believe in a love that is so pure and real, we should believe in ‘ forever’ against all odds.

We should wake up every day waiting for a miracle.We should believe in miracles and magic and a life that is bigger and better than what we know, we should wake up every day waiting for a miracle.

We should have expectations that are not crushed by reality or rules or rights and wrongs.

We should be silly and playful and laugh as loudly as we can, we shouldn’t worry about what people might say. We shouldn’t suppress our laughter or our joy.

We should play house and dream of our perfect home. A home that is built with love, not broken hearts and unfulfilled promises or empty rooms and unspoken words. We should believe in a happy home – one we want to go to every night and wake up in every morning.

We should live like we don’t know any better.

Here Are Seven Awesome Psalms To Read Whenever You Are Struggling With Depression And Anxiety.

They are:

Psalm 23:4

“Even though I walk through the darkest valley, I will fear no evil, for you are with me; your rod and your staff, they comfort me.”

God’s words bring peace (psalmsquotes)

Psalm 27:1–3

“God, You are my light and my salvation, whom shall I fear? You are the strength of my life, of whom shall I be afraid? When the wicked come against me to eat up my flesh, my enemies and foes, they stumbled and fell. Though an army may encamp against me, my heart shall not fear!”

Psalm 32:7

“You are my hiding place; you will protect me from trouble and surround me with songs of deliverance.”

Psalm 46:1

“God is our refuge and strength, an ever-present help in trouble.”

God’s words bring peace (bibleverseimages)

Psalm 55:22

“Cast your cares on the Lord and he will sustain you; he will never let the righteous fall.”

Psalm 61:1–3

“Hear my cry, O God; from the ends of the earth I cry to You, when my heart is overwhelmed, lead me to the rock that is higher than I. For you are a shelter for me, a strong tower from the enemy…”

Psalm 34:1–10

“I will bless You at all times, Your praise will continually be in my mouth. I sought You, Lord, and You heard me, You delivered me from all my fears. When we look to You we are radiant. Your angels encamp all around those who fear You and You deliver us. Help me to taste and see that You are good, oh Lord. You say I will be blessed when I trust You. Those who seek You lack no good thing.”

Beliefs That Will Free Your Mind From Negativity

A quick one with 10 solid points.

1. Life may not be easy, but it could be great. Even though we may be faced with a lot of unfortunate events that we were not prepared for, we could still be happy living in an imperfect life if we shift our mindset. Simply by knowing that life’s ups require life’s downs, we will be better-equipped to embrace life’s predicaments.

2. People who disappoint us are merely lessons. They were there to teach us something about ourselves or about life. The biggest changes often come from the biggest disappointments. That’s how we grow and evolve and make better choices in the future.

3. We can’t change our past but we can change our future. We are not defined by what we did, we are defined by what we choose to become. We are capable of changing our lives any time if we take responsibility for our lives and proactively work on changing ourselves.

4. Assumptions and judgments are the root of all negativity. Instead of jumping to conclusions or making false assumptions we should live day by day and let time unfold the real answers we are looking for. Consuming our minds with assumptions will only lead to confusion and frustration.

5. Just because something good ends, doesn’t mean something better won’t begin. Our life is in constant motion and progression – so are we. Often good things end because they are no longer right for us, and we have to wait and be hopeful that life has better things in store for us.

6. Start each day with a thankful heart. We should be thankful for our health, our bodies, and for the gift of life in general. The most powerful way to get rid of negativity is to be thankful for the things we have that we take for granted on a daily basis.

7. Some things take time. Stay patient. Just because something isn’t happening for us right now, doesn’t mean it will never happen. Timing makes a huge difference and we have to stay patient and keep asking the universe for what we want and believing that it will happen when it’s supposed to.

8. Without the dark, we would never see the stars. As long as we don’t stay in the dark, good things can come out of really bad situations and we can even come out of it better and stronger people. Sometimes it takes the worst pain to bring out the best in us.

9. The people we surround ourselves with matter more than we think. If we surround ourselves with people who lift us higher and see great potential in us, we will be able to get rid of negativity faster. Don’t spend time with people who thrive on drama, they will strip away your happiness.

10. Only a positive mind can give us a positive life. Negative thoughts are like weeds, they keep growing if we don’t root them out. That’s why we have to keep thinking positively and focus on the things we can control and get rid of all the thoughts that are holding us back one by one.

Addiction is Real. Here’s How to Beat It

Addiction is real

Have you known an addict or been an addict? Are you an addict now?

Unfortunately, addictions come with the human condition. We’ve got alcoholics, drug addicts, sex addicts, workaholics, self-mutilators, and more. You name it, our culture has found it and become addicted to it.

Addiction is defined as anything we do repeatedly that causes harm to ourselves and/or others. The underlying driver to addiction is a general dissatisfaction with your life, your self-image, or identity. In extreme cases, an intense self-hatred and a sense of hopelessness and despair are the foundations of addiction.
Are you saying to yourself right now, “I can’t think of anything I’m addicted to”? Well, I’d say to you, “Come on. We’re all addicted to something.” If you don’t think that’s true of you, look through this list with me.

Are you addicted to:

  • Achievement – Always needing to perform to feel valuable
  • Self-Pity – Constant feeling of “poor me” and “life is unfair”
  • Worry – A consistent lack of peace
  • Drinking – You need a drink to be happy, sleep, or feel connected to people
  • Being Busy – If you’re alone or still, you feel depressed or lonely
  • Sex – You can’t stop viewing porn, quit masturbating , or view the others without sexual thoughts.
  • Social Media – You’re constantly connected to your phone or computer, ignoring the people right in front of you
  • Gambling – A need to take risk, make money, and feel valued from winning
  • Self-Sabotage – You can’t hold on to a relationship, you screw up great opportunities, and you can’t allow yourself to succeed.

Yes, you can be addicted to so-called positive things such as achievement. Look at Dale Partridge for example. He struggled with a serious addiction of being busy and achievement. Achievement became part of his identity. He started 6 businesses within 8 years producing over $15 million in revenue. But he didn’t know who was apart from outside praise and achievement. His addiction to work and achievement linked directly with a general dissatisfaction, if not, a downright dislike for who he was. He thought that his identity and worth was based solely in what I accomplished instead of who he was.

The bottom line is this: we all just want to be loved. We want to feel loved. We all deserve love. We starve for connectivity and depth, but we’re seriously scared and often times, lack the basic relational ability to reach out and get it.

So, if you had to choose something, what would you say you’re addicted to? Think about your thoughts for the day. Are there patterns? Ruts? Are there places in your mind that you continue to visit and obsess over during each 24-hour period?

What are they? Be brave and write them down. Let’s begin the healing process.

I want you to pay attention here. You deserve better. You deserve more. You were created for awe and purpose. You were created to love and be loved. The things that grip you don’t have to strangle the life out of you. There is hope and there is a way out.

Today begin telling yourself the opposite of the lies in your head. Begin practicing love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness and self-control. Tell a trusted friend about your addiction. Reach out. Call a group. Don’t wait. This is your life we’re talking about.

You deserve normal. You deserve love, balance, joy, peace, and success. Go after it.

Very Important Life Lessons

I want to share with you 4 very important life lessons that were reinforced for me over the 3 hours.

These are truly foundations for our happiness and success.

While I’ve had these reflections individually many times in the past, recently all 4 have culminated together for me and it feels like they’re now written in the cells of my body, singing out to be aligned with and honored!

Okay let’s dive in to the points!!!

VIL 1. Do Only What Resonates

Resonance is a feeling you get, telling you that something is good, aligned, and right for you.

The opposite of resonance is dissonance, meaning you feel something isn’t aligned.

Too many people navigate their lives doing things that do not resonate, in places that are not resonant, with people who don’t resonate with them.

If we make our choices about what we do in life based on our thinking mind alone, we can end up in all sorts of trouble and dissonance like this.

Instead, we need to notice what we feel, what RESONATES when we are making our choices about work, money, relationships, health, lifestyle and more.

VIL 2. Be in a State of Ease

As you go about whatever you do, personally and professionally, it’s all about HOW you do it.

Too often we race around in life in such a hurry to get things done, resisting life, aggrieved by things that bother us, frustrated by unexpected situations and people that seem to distract us from what we would prefer to be experiencing.

We may push ahead and force with strong, intentional energy to “get things done” and achieve our goals, but to what end?

Are we sitting there at the finish line feeling ragged and worn? And/or have we left a trail of issues behind us, paying a price in our health, relationships, finances or lifestyle because of the way we have been operating?

If you want to have a happy life then:

  • Recognize how it feels inside your body when you are at ease – there is a lightness to that feeling, a grace, a flow.
  • Recognize how it feels inside your body when you are pushing, forcing, racing, resisting, stressed and tense – there is a very definite physiological difference to ease!
  • Pay attention in your daily life to what you feel in your body – you will quickly start to notice if you’re operating from a state of ease and grace, or from a state of stress and tension.
  • Use breathing and a mantra to shift yourself back into ease in that moment. e.g Breathe in, “I choose to feel at ease”, breathe out, “All is well and I’m in my flow”

VIL 3. Remember You Can’t Do Everything

Well, technically you can do everything you want (over your lifetime) but you most definitely can’t do it all at once!

You can’t please everyone, you can’t be all things to all people, and you can’t achieve all your goals in one go while also caring for your relationships, health, work and personal life. So you have to make conscious choices about what to give your precious energy to.

I recently read a wonderful book on Essentialism – the art of focusing on what is essential, and not getting distracted by the gazillions of non-essential things that call for one’s attention each day. And my takeaway so far, which is so profound for me, is this…

There will be many good things you can focus on and give your time to. But there are only a small handful of GREAT things. To be most effective and successful, means deciphering the great from the good – saying yes to great, saying no to good…

I’ve previously had a major issue with this, struggling to say no to good things. It’s like we’re wired to say yes to all the good things in life. Good people, good opportunities, good experiences, good ideas. But there are actually many goodies! And we can’t do it all. From experience, trying to do it all leaves you burned out!

So, if you want to be highly effective AND happy, then:

VIL 4. Every Path Has Both Pros and Cons

And here is the very important lesson…

In saying goodbye, I was sobbing with such a deep, deep sadness in my heart. Yet, at the very same time, in every cell of my body as I bawled my eyes out hugging my parents and siblings goodbye, I knew what my intuition was telling me – to continue my path (even though my path leads me away from the physical presence of those I love).

When it comes to having an amazing life, please know that there is no perfect. There is only the choice of living your most soul-aligned path, whatever that looks like in any given moment, and accepting all that it gifts you and teaches you as you flow with it.

So, if you want to go big on your goals, and live the life of your dreams, then:

  • Focus on your inner voice, celebrate the pros of your path, peacefully accept the cons.
  • Such cons will exist with all choices. It’s called opportunity cost. With one path chosen, all other paths are not. But rest assured your soul will always lead you to the life experience you are here on this beautiful earth to have.
  • Leave no room for fear to reside in your mind. Trust yourself and remind yourself regularly of why you make the choices you do and why your goals are important.
  • Keep it real – SOMETIMES THE RIGHT CHOICE AND DIRECTION CAN ALSO BE THE HARDEST. And this, my friends, is the colorful ride that we call life!

Guys don’t get it twisted. Ain’t the writer of this. Lol! As mentioned in my first paragraph, i got motivated just some few hours back reading this beautiful piece that so referred to my life. All credit goes to Bernadette Logue.