Why People Reject Themselves

It would be easy to accept ourselves if we had no flaws. But we do have flaws. The number reason most people reject themselves is because of their weaknesses and mistakes. They can’t separate their “who” from their “do”, and consequently they carry shame and reproach from the past. They focus so much on their faults that they can’t see their strengths.Image result for rejection

After a seminar from a powerful woman of God, a woman said, “I had so much strife in my life that there was not one area or relationship that was not strife filled and strife controlled”. She went on to say that everything she did was motivated by and done with strife. She was continually disappointed with herself and judging and criticizing herself. She had contempt for all her faults and weaknesses, and she had never been able to see her strengths. Because she rejected herself, she rejected all the abilities God had given her. She felt terrible about who she was and was constantly striving to be better.

She said that she had heard people speak of the peace that passes understanding, but she had never understood what they meant until she heard the powerful message of the woman of God on strife. When she learned that God didn’t count her weaknesses and flaws against her, she experienced peace for the first time in her life.

We all have some strengths and weaknesses. The time  read the story of this lady, it taught me a lot about the peace of God, and also we are not meant to be perfect because we are all born to sin. Only by the sacrificial blood of Jesus that saved us. Uncle Paul testified: I will all the more gladly glory in my weaknesses and infirmities, that the strength and power of Christ may rest upon me. (2 Corinthians 12:9).

Uncle Paul wrestled with his weaknesses, but he learned that Christ’s strength and grace would be sufficient. If we want to learn to accept ourselves, this is essential for us to do as well. We need to know who we are, see our weaknesses as Jesus sees them, know where to lean, and beware of judging others- also beware of their judgments of us. Most of all, we need to live in the truth of our righteousness.

N:B When that mood comes were you feel you are no good and your weaknesses are too much for Jesus to forgive you, or for you to be blessed. Just look at Jesus and not what people will say or judge your actions. Stay focused on Jesus and be motivated to move on pass your weaknesses and see your strength more.

The fictional character in this article “woman of God” is Joyce Meyer.

Advertisements

Weakness or Strength #inspiration #motivation

Sometimes our biggest weakness can become our biggest strength. Take, for example, the story of one 10-year-old boy who decided to study Judo despite the fact that he had lost his left arm in a devastating car accident.


The boy began lessons with an old Japanese Judo master. The boy was doing well, so he couldn’t understand why, after three months of training the master had taught him only one move.
“Sensei,” the boy finally said, “Shouldn’t I be learning more moves?”
“This is the only move you know, but this is the only move you’ll ever need to know.” – the sensei replied.
Not quite understanding, but believing in his teacher, the boy kept training.
Several months later, the sensei took the boy to his first tournament. Surprising himself, the boy easily won his first two matches. The third match proved to be more difficult, but after some time, his opponent became impatient and charged; the boy deftly used his one move to win the match. Still amazed by his success, the boy was now in the finals.
This time, his opponent was bigger, stronger, and more experienced. For a while, the boy appeared to be overmatched. Concerned that the boy might get hurt, the referee called a time-out. He was about to stop the match when the sensei intervened.
“No,” the sensei insisted, “Let him continue.”
Soon after the match resumed, his opponent made a critical mistake: he dropped his guard. Instantly, the boy used his move to pin him. The boy had won the match and the tournament. He was the champion.
On the way home, the boy and sensei reviewed every move in each and every match. Then the boy summoned the courage to ask what was really on his mind.
“Sensei, how did I win the tournament with only one move?”
“You won for two reasons,” the sensei answered. “First, you’ve almost mastered one of the most difficult throws in all of judo. And second, the only known defense for that move is for your opponent to grap your left arm.”
The boy’s biggest weakness had become his biggest strength.

An Inspirational Story For Today: Weakness Or Strength #inspiration #motivated #top post

Sometimes our biggest weakness can become our biggest strength. Take, for example, the story of one 10-year-old boy who decided to study Judo despite the fact that he had lost his left arm in a devastating car accident.

The boy began lessons with an old Japanese Judo master. The boy was doing well, so he couldn’t understand why, after three months of training the master had taught him only one move.

“Sensei,” the boy finally said, “Shouldn’t I be learning more moves?”

“This is the only move you know, but this is the only move you’ll ever need to know.” – the sensei replied.

Not quite understanding, but believing in his teacher, the boy kept training.

Several months later, the sensei took the boy to his first tournament. Surprising himself, the boy easily won his first two matches. The third match proved to be more difficult, but after some time, his opponent became impatient and charged; the boy deftly used his one move to win the match. Still amazed by his success, the boy was now in the finals.

This time, his opponent was bigger, stronger, and more experienced. For a while, the boy appeared to be overmatched. Concerned that the boy might get hurt, the referee called a time-out. He was about to stop the match when the sensei intervened.
“No,” the sensei insisted, “Let him continue.”

Soon after the match resumed, his opponent made a critical mistake: he dropped his guard. Instantly, the boy used his move to pin him. The boy had won the match and the tournament. He was the champion.

On the way home, the boy and sensei reviewed every move in each and every match. Then the boy summoned the courage to ask what was really on his mind.

“Sensei, how did I win the tournament with only one move?”

“You won for two reasons,” the sensei answered. “First, you’ve almost mastered one of the most difficult throws in all of judo. And second, the only known defense for that move is for your opponent to grap your left arm.”

The boy’s biggest weakness had become his biggest strength. Sometimes our biggest weakness can become our biggest strength.

Stay motivated and free, keep driving till the weakness turns to strength.