Social Media Habits Linked To Depression

Social media is a platform where many users post the highlights of their lives – but scientists say it may be making some people depressed.

A study, conducted by researchers at Texas State University, analysed the habits of 500 students frequently using Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Snapchat.

It was found that while the users’ reasons for using the platforms were not linked with mental illnesses, how they interacted with the platforms were.

Those who compared themselves with others they considered “better off than” also had a higher likelihood of having depression.

Those who scored highly on the “social media addiction” component also had higher depression ratings. This section was based on statements such as “you have tried to cut down on the use of social media without success” and “you use social media so much that it has had a negative impact on your job/studies”.

Those with depression who used social media were more bothered by being tagged in unflattering photos, and were less likely to post pictures of themselves with other people.

“People tend to make themselves look better off than they really are” on social media. “This is not someone’s ‘real life.’ It’s important to recognize that.”

It’s not the first time social media has been linked to bad habits. Studies earlier this year have also connected the platforms to overspending and overeating.

My next post will emphasize more on these points.

Drop your comments let me know what you think!

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The Catastrophe Of Identity

Jesus preached an absolute fidelity to the truth. We as His followers are told in Ephesians 6 to “gird our loins with truth“: wrapping your innermost core with God’s word and definitions. Why is this important? Because our innermost core is essentially our identity. If your self-perception is on point and your deepest sense of identity is aligned with the truth of God’s word, you will not lose course. You will be able to weather any storm.

In case you haven’t noticed, there seems to be a little bit of a crazy, waywardness among the world right now. In a fit of lost self-identity, everything now goes as acceptable. Any resistance to this “freedom” is fought with assaults against the identity of the one with an opposing view. Any slew of negative adjectives recently thrown at the Church begins to fill the mind.

The problem is, as a church, we’re listening to these assaults on our identity.

In a misguided effort to be relevant, we’ve become too sensitive to the opinions of the world about us. We’re sacrificing some of the core of our identity and what God defines as right and wrong. We have placed parts of our identity in who the world thinks we are, instead of who God says we are.

Many believers even think that if they win approval from the world, then they are being relatable and serving Jesus better. The only issue is, I think Jesus may or may not have said something to the effect of knowing you’re on His approved course when the world is by and large persecuting you for your beliefs, not silently approving of them. See Matthew 5:10, 2 Timothy 3:12, 1 Peter 4:12-14, etc. Persecution is the sign of doing something right in God’s eyes.

So as an effect, the church can no longer deliver the truth because it too is now struggling with identity. We take our cues on our identity from a world that knows its own so little that it’s confused about whether or not it is okay to be male or female. You, chosen warriors, do not drop your spiritual armor and your mantle to the ground. Do not drop it just because of the constant jeering and pressuring about your identity from the world. The world is in such a dire state it does not know how to even spell the word anymore. That is incredibly silly, akin to a ship captain with a working compass changing his course because some wayward boats are continually wandering pressure him to do so.

So, who are we?

Our past does not define us. The thoughts of others do not define who we are. Our own thoughts about ourselves do not even define us. Thoughts, past actions, and the labels given by others are not the elements defining our true identity. Words from a true authority are what defines us. Specifically, the words of Jesus over us. When you acknowledge who Jesus is, He will in turn acknowledge who you are. When you define Jesus as He really is, He defines you as you really are.

In the nonessentials, sure be relevant. But in the core, unmovable truths of God, be unrelenting. The world *needs* that in the church, whether they realize it or not. It is the “salt” Jesus calls us to be. Some may brand a swirling, uncontrollable global state of “do whatever you want” sin as fresh and freeing, but it’s not. It’s actually ancient, and stale. The most overplayed tune of all that just keeps trying to rebrand itself throughout millennia. Galatians 5 calls it repetitive and joyless.

The doctrines of God are eternal, in both time and depth.

Always fresh and original the deeper you delve into them. Jesus offended a lot of people and never traded in His identity to the endless pressure against it everywhere He went, and He never tried to be fresh or cool. He still ended up being the most refreshing, original, and magnetic being to ever walk the earth.

Do not be afraid to be truth, do not be afraid to speak truth.

Jesus came only to heal the sick. Someone can’t know if they have cancer until they go see a doctor and become informed. Nor can the world know it too is sick unless someone tells them the truth. A doctor can’t heal someone who never comes in for treatment because they’re oblivious to their dying condition. And Jesus truly is the one and only great healer.

You can drop your contributions ….

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Poll: Most Churches Avoid Discussing Social Issues

Originally posted by Veronica Neffinger

Social Issues

Am not used to posting this kinda topic but it caught my eye during my research.

A Pew Research Center poll has revealed that most Christians do not hear about relevant social issues from the pulpits of their churches.

Firstthings.com reports that the poll surveyed over 4,000 churchgoers. All survey participants had attended at least one religious service within the past few months.

The poll asked respondents how often they heard about various social issues in a sermon. Only forty percent of respondents said that the pastor had spoken about religious liberty. Thirty-nine percent said that the pastor had spoken about homosexuality. And only 29 percent said they heard about abortion from the pulpit.

Because of how vocal many in the Christian community appear to be on social and political issues, these results were surprising to many.

The findings of the survey held true across denominations, including for White Evangelicals, Black Protestants, and Roman Catholics.

Possible reasons for why clergy are reluctant to discuss such sensitive social issues from the pulpit are that they are afraid of the controversy such a discussion may ignite, or they may be afraid of losing their tax-exempt status

So I throw this question to the house. Do you think social issues are rarely raised and addressed to in our churches?

Please drop your contributions in the comment section.