Repost: When Your Blessings Have Stains

One day a man who had been walking, catching rides and using Uber to go to work every day was given a car by a family member. He was so thankful. All he had to do was have a few things fixed. As he drove it home, he stopped to get gas and the car wouldn’t start. Wow! He had to have the car towed to the shop. After they fixed it, as he drove it home he let the window down and it wouldn’t come back up. He said, “Are you serious!!!!”

As he drove back to the shop so they could fix the window he noticed stains on the seats.


He said, “Why does everything I get have to be STAINED!!!”


He then immediately remembered that he had transportation to work, the store or to take his lady friend out on a date. He also remembered the fact that the price he paid for the repairs was still better than having a car payment for years. He immediately thanked God and asked him to forgive him for so quickly allowing frustration to take away the excitement of his blessing.

So many times God will bless us and if it’s not exactly the way we wanted it or comes with some imperfections, inconveniences or responsibilities, we can find ourselves with an unthankful attitude.

The bible reminds us that every gift God gives is perfect…

James 1:17 (NKJV)

17 Every good gift and every perfect gift is from above, and comes down from the Father of lights, with whom there is no variation or shadow of turning.

The next time you begin to see stains on your blessings, remember that every gift from God is perfect.

Any stains we see are on our eyes and not the blessing.

Originally written by Minister Aldtric Johnson M.A

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Things We Should Say To Ourselves More Often

1. Good job.

We should give ourselves a pat on the back for the things we are trying to accomplish every day and the people we are trying to become. Even if we’re not there yet, at least we are trying and we deserve to give ourselves credit from time to time.

2. There will always be bumps on the road and that’s okay.

We will always be faced with obstacles but that’s how we learn how to really drive and which roads to avoid. Nothing will ever go exactly the way we want them to but this doesn’t mean that we are headed in the wrong direction. Sometimes a change in direction leads to a better way.

3. Life is not a race.

We can’t keep competing with everyone like it’s a race and we need to get to the finish line first. We should just run as fast as we can or as slow as we can as long as we keep looking ahead and moving forward. We shouldn’t be concerned about winning because life is not a race.

4. Feel the fear and do it anyway.

If we stop doing things because we’re scared, we won’t be doing much. Fear is part of life and the only way to get over it is to just go ahead and do what scares us – especially if it will bring us closer to the life we want to live.

5. Some people are not meant to stay.

We will meet a lot of people who will not stay in our lives no matter how much we want them to. Instead of trying to find out why they can’t stay, accept that this is how life works sometimes. Maybe life wants to replace them with better people or maybe you just need to learn how to be on your own for a while.

6. The depth of your love today is the depth of your wound tomorrow.

Before we recklessly give our hearts to people and invest in them, we need to know if they are really worth the pain and the suffering that may come with loving them. Some people are worth suffering for and some people are not. We have to pick our battles wisely.

7. We may not solve all our problems but we can change our mindset.

We can’t control everything that happens to us; we can only control the way we respond to them. As long as we manage our mindset, we will be able to cope with certain difficulties better and we will make our lives a bit easier.

8. Do not settle.

Don’t stay at a job you hate, don’t marry someone you don’t love, don’t stay friends with people who belittle you. Life can be good if we choose not to settle for the things that impede our happiness.

9. Time heals everything.

Eventually our pain will go away, our mistakes will be forgiven, our hearts will mend and our minds will find peace.

10. We are never alone.

We are never alone in our struggles or alone in our lives. We will always find people who want to be there for us and support us and people who genuinely love us. Sometimes we think we are alone, but that’s just our minds tricking us into thinking that life is harder than it’s supposed to be.

What If We Saw Souls Instead Of Bodies?

What If We Saw Souls Instead Of Body

If we could see souls instead of bodies, what would be beautiful?

What is the first thing people would know about you? What would you be most afraid of them seeing? Who would you impress? Who would you love?

What would you adjust as you walked past the mirror? What kind of work would you be in? What would your goals be, how would you strive to be better if what you collected in the bank or put on your body or attached next to your name on a business card no longer affected what people saw?

Would you spend your time in gyms and stores or in libraries and temples? Who would you let yourself fall in love with? What would your ‘type’ be? Tall, dark and handsome or creative, kind and self-aware?

Who would we idolize, and what? How much of our governing body would be fit to lead? Who would we make famous? Who would we celebrate?

Would we restructure our value system to prioritize the things that bring us true peace and desire, not just better than the norm? What would we do with all that money, if we weren’t spending it on decorating and changing and convincing everybody else that we are a way we really aren’t?

How would we define success? As who gathers the most shit around their souls or who is transformed the most and shines the brightest? What would it be like, if our priority was to just become lightness? What kindness and joy and healing and rawness would come of the journey there?

What would happen if we could see people not as “bad,” but as… blocked? If we could see the ways they’ve packed away their pain, or how they hold a belief that keeps them away from being kind to others? How they are unaware that those issues even exist?

What if we weren’t afraid of the ways people are different than us?

What would happen if we realized our bodies never wanted anything more than to feel connected, and acted out on nothing more than their false ideas of being separate, different, exiled, the odd one out, the almost-but-not-good-enough?

What would happen if we embraced our desire to play out and frame with our individualism, but eventually returned to the knowing that we are all just energy fields? And where would we be if we realized that we were all from the same one? What would happen if we realized we really weren’t that different at all?

Maybe One Day We’ll Figure This Life Out

Figuring Life Out

Maybe one day we’ll know why certain people have left us and why they didn’t come back. One day we will be able to connect the dots and understand how the pieces we didn’t understand all found their way to fit into the puzzle of our lives and complete the picture.

Maybe one day we’ll know why destiny keeps bringing certain people back into our lives or why their lessons had to be learned over and over again so we can finally know it by heart.

Maybe those people are meant to be a bigger part of our future and they keep reappearing to remind us that their part in our story is not over.
Maybe one day we’ll know why we left certain jobs and why we were forced to change directions. Maybe we were meant to change the world and our jobs weren’t going to make that happen. Maybe we are free spirits who are destined to roam the world freely without being caged in an orbit of predictability.

Maybe one day we’ll know why we didn’t get along with our parents or our relatives. Maybe we were meant to go out and make new friends and find people who teach us that we don’t have to share the same blood to count as family. Maybe we were meant to get lost and wander to find where we truly belong – to find a home we don’t want to escape from.

Maybe we were meant to fail and be laughed at to learn how to shield ourselves from the stones that keep getting thrown our way.

Maybe we needed to learn how to walk on pebbles so we can walk slowly and discover that there is more than one path along the way.

Maybe we were meant to be laughed at so we can understand that one person’s tragedy is another person’s comedy.

Maybe we were meant to fall in love with the wrong people to learn that love doesn’t discriminate. That the heart doesn’t know the rules or the terms or the social conduct. It just feels and jumps recklessly into anything that moves it. Maybe we need to learn that love will always be inexplicable, something of the Gods, something that calls us to do things that are unfamiliar to us. Something that makes us believe in magic – a dream that meddles in the nightmares of reality.

Maybe we were meant to sail away from the shore to learn the methods of surviving alone, to learn that loneliness won’t kill us and solitude can be our friend. Maybe we need to disappear to see who will care to find us, who will care to bring us back to life, who will wonder about us and who will wish we never find our way back.

Maybe we needed to be scared so we can understand that we will never be fearless but we can be courageous and we can be brave. Maybe one day we will know if our fear is merely a reflection of our own insecurities or fear of our own greatness . Maybe one day we will know why we were so afraid to shine.

Maybe one day we will know why we just can’t be happy, why we are always searching for something to stress us out so we can feel like we are part of society, why we always have to feel ‘useful’ to be accepted, why we always want more than what we have and why we feel like it’s a crime to just exist – just be – bounded by our nothingness.

Maybe one day we will look back and life will make sense, maybe one day we will stop asking so many questions and let the answers find us. Maybe one day we will know for sure why we wasted so much trying to get a grasp of life that we forgot that we are here to live it – not understand it.

Dead Fish Or Smart Fish

This post was originally posted on The Daily Positive.

When you genuinely don’t know what to do or where to go, you are in a blessed position. It’s time to stop “trying hard” to figure it out, and instead start tuning into life around you. You are being guided. If your mind is still, your heart is open, and you are patient… the way will become clear.

There’s an old saying, “Only dead fish go with the flow”.

🌊🌊🐠🌊🌊

The meaning of this saying is pretty clear…

Fish swim with the current or against it, but they are always intentional and active, going somewhere.

If not, and they were simply going with the flow, they would be dead. I’m not sure if that is true, but we get the point.

Applying that to life as a human being, you might accidentally think that “going with the flow” means you are inactive, unintentional, directionless and not fully living.

Today let’s reflect on an alternative viewpoint to this – because mindfulness, conscious living, faith and spirituality all teaches us differently about the VALUE and PLACE of going with the flow at certain times of our life.

Let’s say there are 3 ways you could be living right now:

🐟 You’re a fish on a mission achieving your goals – you know what you want, you’re working on it, your life has a clear vision and you’re feeling good about that.

🐟 You’re a fish without clarity on what you want or where you’re going – as a result it’s a little challenging! But, you’re a smart fish, so you’ve decided to go with the flow of life as best you can, and you’re paying attention to your inner voice, to the energy of life around you, to opportunities and synchronicities – ready for guidance and direction to become clear in divine and order timing. You trust.

🐟 You’re a fish who has given up and you’ve stopped participating in life completely. You don’t know what you want or where to go, and you’ve closed your mind and heart. There is no interest in or presence to the incredible force of life and divinity all around you… so you’re highly unlikely to see any guidance when it comes knocking on your door.

Should you ever face a point in your life where your direction is unclear, this does not mean you have no direction.

It means you are in a blessed position for an exciting, new, divinely ordered unfolding to take place for you and through you.

It only requires that you be open and patient, and that you are ready to say YES to whatever intuitive nudges or signs might show up to guide you.

Repost: 15 Signs The Only Problem With Your Life Is The Way You Think About It

1. You generally spend more time thinking about your life than you do actually living it. You spend more time dissecting problems than you do coming to solutions, more time daydreaming than you do asking yourself what those thoughts indicate is lacking or missing in your waking life, or coming up with new solutions as opposed to actually committing to the ones that are already in front of you. You’ve replaced “reflection” with “experience,” and wonder why you feel unfulfilled.

2. You don’t find wonder in the simple pleasures, the way you once did. You think nature is boring and “play” is for children and there’s nothing awe-inspiring about a shaft of light through the window or a stranger’s smile or a spring day or your favorite book in bed. When you’ve lost sight of the magic of the little things, it’s not because the magic has gone elsewhere, only that you’ve chosen to disregard it in favor of something else.

3. You have something you wanted in the past, but you don’t enjoy it the way you thought you would, or you’ve replaced your desire for it with a desire for something else. Bring yourself back to the feeling of wanting what you have more than anything, the way you once did. Try to embody that. You’re making yourself prouder than you realize.

4. If you were to tell your younger self what your life is like now, they’d be in disbelief. You seriously could not have imagined that your life would turn out as well as it did – that the worst things became turning points, not endless black holes of emotion.

5. You think of money in terms of “obligation” not “opportunity.” Your mindset is: “I have to pay my bills,” as opposed to “I get to pay my bills, which house me, clothe me, and feed me, and that I can pay for by myself.” If you don’t value money by appreciating what it does for you, you’ll never feel as though you have enough.

6. You think you don’t have enough friends. You’re measuring the connection in your life by a quantity, not a quality, assuming that the problem is not enough around you, when it’s really that there’s not enough inside you.

7. You’re either over-reliant or under-attached to the friends you do have. You either don’t keep in touch enough or you get easily frustrated because you think that friends should make you feel “better” and “happy” in an unrealistic way. So you think that the only way to achieve that is to over-bond yourself to them, or disregard them when they don’t fulfill the role you’ve imposed on them (hence your feeling as though you don’t have enough!)

8. You imagine your life as though someone else was seeing it. Before you make a decision, you recite a storyline in your head. It goes something like this: “she went to college, she got this job, she married this guy after a terrible breakup, and all was well.” This is what happens when your happiness starts to come from how other people feel about you, as opposed to how you feel about yourself.

9. Your goals are outcomes, not actions. Your goals are to “be successful” or “see a certain number in the bank” as opposed to “enjoy what you do each day, no matter what you’re doing” or “learn to love saving more than frivolously spending.” Outcomes are just ideas. Actions are results.

10. You assume you have time. When it comes to doing what really matters to you – reconnecting with family, writing that book, finding a new job – you say “I’m only [such and such an age] I have a long time.” If you assume you “have time” to do something, or that you’ll do it later, you probably don’t want it as much as you think you do. There isn’t more time. You don’t know. You could be dead tomorrow. It doesn’t mean you have to get everything done today, but that there’s rarely an excuse not to start.

11. A bad feeling becomes a bad day. You think that experiencing negative emotions is the result of something being wrong in your life, when in reality, it’s usually just a part of being human. Anxiety serves us, pain serves us, depression does too. These things are signals, communications, feedbacks, and precautions that literally keep us alive. Until you begin thinking this way, all you will perceive is that “good feelings mean keep going” and “bad feelings mean stop,” and wonder why you’re paralyzed.

12. You think that being uncomfortable and fearful means you shouldn’t do something. Being uncomfortable and fearful means you definitely should. Being angry or indifferent means you definitely shouldn’t.

13. You wait to feel motivated or inspired before you act. Losers wait to feel motivated. People who never get anything done wait to feel inspired. Motivation and inspiration are not sustaining forces. They crop up once in awhile, and they’re nice while they’re present, but you can’t expect to be able to summon them any given hour of the day. You must learn to work without them, to gather your strength from purpose, not passion.

14. You maladaptively daydream. Maladaptive daydreaming is when you imagine extensive fantasies of an alternative life that you don’t have to replace human interaction or general function. Most people experiencing it while listening to music and/or moving (walking, riding in a car, pacing, swinging, etc.) Rather than cope with issues in life, you just daydream to give yourself a “high” that eliminates the uncomfortable feeling.

15. You’re saving up your happiness for another day. You’re sitting on the train on the way to work, thinking how beautiful the sunrise looks, and how you’d like to read your favorite book, but you don’t in favor of checking your email again. You begin to feel a sense of awe at something simple and beautiful, and stop yourself, because your dissatisfaction fuels you. You’re creating problems in one area of your life to balance out thriving in another, because your happiness is in a mental container.

Originally posted by Brianna Weist

Don’t Find Fault

Pray don’t find fault with the man who limps
Or stumbles along the road,
Unless you have worn the shoes he wears
Or struggled beneath his load.

There may be tacks in his shoes that hurt,
Though hidden from view;
Or the burden he bears, placed on your back
Might cause you to stumble, too.

Don’t sneer at the man who’s down today,
Unless you have felt the blow
That caused his fall, or felt the shame
That only the fallen know.

You may be strong, but still the blows
That were his, if dealt to you
In the selfsame way at the very selfsame time
Might cause you to struggle, too.

Don’t be hard with the man who sins
Or pelt him with words or stones,
Unless you are sure, and doubly sure
That you have no sins of your own;
For, you know, perhaps, if the tempters voice
Should whisper soft to you
As it did to him when he went astray,
It would cause you to falter, too.

Reasons You Shouldn’t Be Afraid To Ruthlessly Edit Your Life

People are very judgmental of those who like to “edit” their lives. They accuse them of not being happy in the moment, never being satisfied, being flighty, and so on. While it’s not to say that any one of those things is untrue – it is to say that everybody should take it upon themselves to edit their lives, and while being mindful of the feelings of those involved, still not apologize for pursuing what you truly want.

1. Greatness is a product of practice and commitment – you’re not supposed to get it “right” the first time. Any relationship, project, achievement or endeavor – from how you decorate your house to publish your first book – is a linear process. It’s never a matter of whether or not you get it right the first time, but how willing you are to keep trying.

2. It takes courage to change by your own volition. It takes guts to say “this is not the life I wanted… so I’m going to start over again.” It’s likely that the people who are judgmental of this wish they could do it, or that they had the means to.

3. Settling is the easy way out disguised as the comfortable, “ideal” option. And often, we can confuse the peace and ease and lure of “settling” with what we actually desire.

4. People who edit their lives believe they deserve the lives they want. They believe they deserve loving friends, and happy relationships, and to actualize all of their dreams, even if they have to work really hard to get there. It’s their inherent feeling of being worthy that makes them push forward.

5. It takes intelligence and heart to admit that you weren’t right the first time. Many people avoid changing their lives simply because they don’t want to take the ego hit of feeling as though they were “wrong.”

6. Everything is about evolution, at the end of the day. You will become excellent at what you practice each day – regardless of whether that’s art or gossip or brooding or music. Your life will accumulate to the sum of the little moments – no matter what they’re filled with. You will grow regardless, edit your life so it’s in a direction you actually want.

At The End Of The Day, Only You Can Make The Difficult Choices

You seek someone’s help, you read articles and books to find answers, you talk to friends and family, you go to a therapist so they can help you make decisions, help you lead a better life and help you quiet the endless cycle of confusion in your head, but at the end of the day you’ll still be the one who needs to make these decisions, after all is said and done, it will be your call. No one else will make them for you when it’s time to take action.

Because even if the whole world told you not to do something and a little voice inside of you whispered that you should, you will end up following that voice.

Here’s the funny thing about human beings, they think they don’t know the answers and sometimes they really don’t but almost everyone knows how to find it or where to find it, almost everyone knows where to start and almost everyone knows what needs to be done, but almost everyone wants confirmation that they’re on the right track, they want someone to tell them they’re right and they want someone to make the decision a little easier.

Because that’s all what we really want; someone to make the decision easier instead of making the actual decision, someone to make us feel like we’re not alone.

But when people don’t agree with us or our decisions, we tend to doubt ourselves and we stop making decisions based on how we feel or what we know and make decisions based on what the people who care about us tell us to do, because sometimes they’re right and sometimes we can take ourselves to hell.

But isn’t making decisions based on someone else a hell of its own? Isn’t living an inauthentic life the worst decision you could possibly make?
I guess what makes decisions easier is that they’re our own, when you make the right decision, you get a sense of pride and ownership that you knew what was right for you and when you make the wrong one, it’s easier to move on with no regrets because it was also all you.

Because if you give the right to choose or the right to decide to someone else, you’re giving away the right to live.

Only you can make the decision to quit or try harder, only you can make the decision to stay or leave, only you can make the decision to love or hate, only you can make the decision to hold on or let go and only you can make the decision to control your life or let others control you.

Decisions can be many things; they can be hard or easy, rash or calculated, temporary or forever and they can also change, but the one thing that shouldn’t change is who makes these decisions.
And that should always be YOU.

Repost: Your Purpose Is On The Other Side Of Your Pain

Chasing a dream is never easy, but the most passionate people stop at nothing once they decide to go for it.

For most of my life, I lacked what I now call an emotional navigation system. I either didn’t have the tools to express the anxiety I felt, or didn’t feel I could do so without being punished for it in some way. So I just avoided pain. Or, I tried to avoid pain. I was obsessed with figuring out what I was meant to do, or being able to determine who I was meant to be with. I thought that if I only did what I was “meant” to, I could never be wrong, I could never get hurt, and I could never lose anything. Growing up, I would sit for hours looking up college course catalogs, making lists of things I could become. On the outside, it looked like ambition, on the inside, it just hurt.

I was a binge thinker. I would identify a problem, and craft a solution. This was how I got by, this is what propelled me. I thought I could calculate success, or make a formula for happiness. My subconscious mantra was “I will be happy when.” If only I could fix this thing about myself, I would feel better. If I only had this much money, or had this relationship, or wore this pant size, it would feel better. But it never felt better. There was perpetually one step between me and feeling okay.

My every move revolved around “purpose.” I thought that if I could figure out what I was here to do, everything would feel better. Everything would be worth it. The truth is that I didn’t have the capability to recognize what was preventing me from feeling happy in the first place. I didn’t understand that the same part of the brain that governs rumination also controls problem-solving, and creativity. The more depressed I was, the more successful I became. Until that became too much.

I know now that being afraid of things going wrong is not the way to make them go right. Releasing that fear is knowing there’s no “right” way for things to go.

What’s interesting about tracing the story back is that along the way, the elusive “signs” of the purpose I spent my life looking for were right in front of me. I was a professional writing major in college, but I never took a creative writing class, because I was too shy to share my thoughts and feelings with peers. In my relationships, as soon as things inched past the point of intimacy that I was comfortable with, I relied on asking myself “Is this right?” rather than “Do I feel this is right?”

I didn’t actually want to be successful, I just wanted to feel better, and I didn’t understand any other way to do that other than to change my life. My greatest success didn’t come from being successful, but who I had to become along the way.

In 2012, I read an article by the writer Ryan O’Connell for the first time – a friend pulled it up for me in the newspaper office in which we worked. I was heartbroken and reeling and heavily medicated and barely getting by. But when I read that article, a weight lifted (literally, physically).

For the first time, someone had articulated exactly what I was going through. I had never read anything like it before. I didn’t know that it was what I wanted to do, I only knew that it made me feel better. So I started doing it, too.
I was first published nearly by accident (I thought it would look good on a résumé). And then, something happened. Something I couldn’t have planned for, something I couldn’t have chosen, yet something that every single thing was leading me to. People started reading. And I kept writing. And then people started reading by the millions. And then tens of millions. The deeper I looked into my own problems, the more thoroughly I analyzed them and expressed them and shared them, the more I could understand other people, and the more rapidly they would respond. The more intimate my confessions, the more people would click and share.

Every little part of my life meant something, I just didn’t know it at the time. Every moment – however unbearable – was crucial. My only purpose was to just be here, and that was it. It would add up on its own. My life would calculate itself; it didn’t need me to judge whatever it came out to. I do believe in purpose, but I don’t believe that you need to know what it is to live it.

I know now that being afraid of things going wrong is not the way to make them go right. Releasing that fear is knowing there’s no “right” way for things to go. It’s a presupposition, one that will hurt you more than it will ever help.