3 Questions To Confirming Your Purpose

Hey guys, thanks for stopping by.

Today I will be pointing out 3 questions to confirming your purpose.

real success story in the mountain,sport couple woman with successful with sunset

Purpose is the feeling of having a definite aim and of being determined to achieve it. A very important thing you want to achieve in life.

Living a life without regret is a universal desire. I’ve had too many sleepless nights around the question, “is this it?” I’ve worked hard… and even had some great achievements, but at times, I’m still troubled by the missed opportunities, the things I’ve never said, the trips I never took, or decisions I’ve failed to make. This is regret.

It’s the feeling of missing out. It can sap your passion, poison your future, and even have an effect on those around you. It leads me to this positive thought:

“In the end, we only regret the chances we didn’t take.”

But in the end, we can’t do it all. We all realize life is moving faster and faster to our final day – and we understand a life without regret is impractical, but how do we live life with less regret? How can we chase our dreams, live our passion, and love our lives all at the same time?

3 Critical Questions to Confirming Your Purpose:

  1. What are you most passionate about? – (Design and Creativity, Charity, Tutor, Entrepreneurship, Etc.)
  2. Who’s most important to you? (Spouse, Best Friend, Cousin, Parents, Children, Strangers, Etc.)
  3. Where is your favorite place on earth? (NYC, Spain, Canada, Australia, Hawaii, Your Home, Church, Etc.)

If you’re doing what you’re passionate about, with the people most important to you, in place that excites you, you are living the dream.

Now, it’s up to you to not only answer these questions but to make at least one of them happen this year… because remember, in the end, we only regret the chances we didn’t take.

Let’s hear from you in our comment section.

Have a productive day!

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Repost: Your Purpose Is On The Other Side Of Your Pain

Chasing a dream is never easy, but the most passionate people stop at nothing once they decide to go for it.

For most of my life, I lacked what I now call an emotional navigation system. I either didn’t have the tools to express the anxiety I felt, or didn’t feel I could do so without being punished for it in some way. So I just avoided pain. Or, I tried to avoid pain. I was obsessed with figuring out what I was meant to do, or being able to determine who I was meant to be with. I thought that if I only did what I was “meant” to, I could never be wrong, I could never get hurt, and I could never lose anything. Growing up, I would sit for hours looking up college course catalogs, making lists of things I could become. On the outside, it looked like ambition, on the inside, it just hurt.

I was a binge thinker. I would identify a problem, and craft a solution. This was how I got by, this is what propelled me. I thought I could calculate success, or make a formula for happiness. My subconscious mantra was “I will be happy when.” If only I could fix this thing about myself, I would feel better. If I only had this much money, or had this relationship, or wore this pant size, it would feel better. But it never felt better. There was perpetually one step between me and feeling okay.

My every move revolved around “purpose.” I thought that if I could figure out what I was here to do, everything would feel better. Everything would be worth it. The truth is that I didn’t have the capability to recognize what was preventing me from feeling happy in the first place. I didn’t understand that the same part of the brain that governs rumination also controls problem-solving, and creativity. The more depressed I was, the more successful I became. Until that became too much.

I know now that being afraid of things going wrong is not the way to make them go right. Releasing that fear is knowing there’s no “right” way for things to go.

What’s interesting about tracing the story back is that along the way, the elusive “signs” of the purpose I spent my life looking for were right in front of me. I was a professional writing major in college, but I never took a creative writing class, because I was too shy to share my thoughts and feelings with peers. In my relationships, as soon as things inched past the point of intimacy that I was comfortable with, I relied on asking myself “Is this right?” rather than “Do I feel this is right?”

I didn’t actually want to be successful, I just wanted to feel better, and I didn’t understand any other way to do that other than to change my life. My greatest success didn’t come from being successful, but who I had to become along the way.

In 2012, I read an article by the writer Ryan O’Connell for the first time – a friend pulled it up for me in the newspaper office in which we worked. I was heartbroken and reeling and heavily medicated and barely getting by. But when I read that article, a weight lifted (literally, physically).

For the first time, someone had articulated exactly what I was going through. I had never read anything like it before. I didn’t know that it was what I wanted to do, I only knew that it made me feel better. So I started doing it, too.
I was first published nearly by accident (I thought it would look good on a résumé). And then, something happened. Something I couldn’t have planned for, something I couldn’t have chosen, yet something that every single thing was leading me to. People started reading. And I kept writing. And then people started reading by the millions. And then tens of millions. The deeper I looked into my own problems, the more thoroughly I analyzed them and expressed them and shared them, the more I could understand other people, and the more rapidly they would respond. The more intimate my confessions, the more people would click and share.

Every little part of my life meant something, I just didn’t know it at the time. Every moment – however unbearable – was crucial. My only purpose was to just be here, and that was it. It would add up on its own. My life would calculate itself; it didn’t need me to judge whatever it came out to. I do believe in purpose, but I don’t believe that you need to know what it is to live it.

I know now that being afraid of things going wrong is not the way to make them go right. Releasing that fear is knowing there’s no “right” way for things to go. It’s a presupposition, one that will hurt you more than it will ever help.

Repost: 23 Sentence Reminders For Anyone Who Knows They Have A Greater Purpose In Life

1. Your purpose is what you do with each moment of your life – the big things are just small things, done over and over again.
2. You do not have to know what your purpose is to be already living it out.
3. There is no purpose that is greater than another, we all affect one another in mysterious and invisible ways.
4. Your skills are not random, they show you what you’re here to work with.
5. The things you worry about are not random, they show you what you’re here to work toward.
6. Your greatest happiness will not come from being comfortable, it will come from being useful.
7. You are not here to be happy all the time, you are here to create and appreciate, two things that tend to arise from discomfort.
8. You will help people more by changing yourself than by telling people how to change themselves.
9. You will inspire more people by being yourself than telling others to be themselves.
10. Everything that happens to you is a resource, it is showing you a part of yourself and forcing you to think in a way you never would have before.
11. You are always growing, so it’s not about whether or not you’re moving forward, but which direction you’re going.
12. Your entire life does not need to unfold today.
13. What you think about you will bring about; what you focus on you will continue to create.
14. Your power, therefore your purpose, mostly resides in how you think.
15. Your purpose is not just that you do one specific thing, but how you go about doing everything.
16. It’s not about how perfect you appear, it’s about how you rationalize your actions and how you mend mistakes when you make them.
17. The most powerful work is that which is done willingly without applause.
18. You do not need applause to be doing purposeful work.
19. You can always decide what you want your purpose to be, and it’s best if you choose something that helps others and makes you feel alive.
20. Purposeful work is not always fun.
21. That does not mean you can’t choose to love it anyway.
22. Your purpose happens in the moment, not in ideas of the past or future or how you appear to others.
23. When all is said and done, people care far less about what you’ve accomplished than they do how you treat others.

By: Brianna Weist