Questions You Should Ask Yourself Daily

The greatest block in your life is YOU.

The greatest solution to that block is also YOU.

If you do not learn from your experiences, and take control of your own energy (your beliefs, thoughts, feelings and actions) then you will surely continue to reap the same results and repeat the same patterns.

If those results and patterns are working for you, then great!

If they’re not, then below are a set of wise questions to help you tap into your own inner wisdom for the answers that will propel you into the year ahead as a clearer, more inspired, empowered and insightful you.

Everything in your life stems from your energy and the paradigm through which you view the world.

So it’s time to own that and POWER UP.

Grab a pen and paper, and answer the following questions.

As you reflect, consider the past 6-12 months of your life, and the coming 6-12 months.

You are going to learn from the past to elevate yourself in the present, and prepare for an inspired future!

  • have I been doing, and continue to do, in my life that I know is NOT working for me?
  • Why have I not yet taken action to ‘course correct’ my journey in order to get different results?
  • What am I procrastinating about doing?
  • What negative habits do I have that I know I need to let go of? Click here to refer to my list “28 Habits that Block Your Happiness & How to Let Them Go”
  • Regarding the greatest challenges that I faced in the past 6-12 months, what lessons did I learn that I can apply in future for my benefit?
  • Is there anything I intended to achieve in the past 6-12 months that did not eventuate?
  • Did I invest my attention, time or resources into my personal growth, knowledge, wellbeing and/or happiness in the past 6-12 months year in any way?
  • What goal, dream or aspiration do I have for myself for the coming 6-12 months that I’m ready to make happen?
  • Where is fear currently controlling me?
  • Am I feeling professionally fulfilled?
  • What would I most like to learn how to do or be for the 6-12 months ahead?
  • How have I been using my “free time” and has that helped me feel inspired, vibrant, healthy and fulfilled?
  • Are my current habits for eating, drinking and exercising working for me or against me?
  • Am I holding any resentment towards others or myself?
  • How could I be of service in the 6-12 months ahead in a way that will make the world a better place?
  • Which of my relationships need more of my loving attention to prosper?
  • Which of my relationships are toxic and no longer serve myself or the other person?
  • What have been my strengths and achievements in the past 6-12 months that I can celebrate?
  • Am I living a life that is meaningful to me?
  • Am I proud of who I am, how I behave and what I offer into the world?
  • What feelings dominated my experience of life in the 6-12 months gone by?
  • What feelings do I most want to experience in the 6-12 months ahead?
  • What I am most passionate about in my life that I’d like to do more of?
  • If I could improve one aspect of my life, what would it be? (e.g. relationships, career, finances, health, state of mind, emotional balance, adventure, self-expression…)
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Does Being Labeled As Gifted Undermine Personal Growth?

Stanford psychologist, Carol Dweck, has spent her career studying the mental phenomena that lead to success. The Effort Effect provides an overview of her findings.

Why do some people reach their potential, while others with equal or greater talent fail?

The answer, according to Dweck, is attitude. In fact, Dweck has observed that believing in fixed intelligence can undermine a person’s ability to succeed.

Many people who believe in fixed intelligence also think you shouldn’t need hard work to do well. This belief isn’t entirely irrational, she says. A student who finishes a problem set in 10 minutes is indeed better at math than someone who takes four hours to solve the problems. And a soccer player who scores effortlessly probably is more talented than someone who’s always practicing. “The fallacy comes when people generalize it to the belief that effort on any task, even very hard ones, implies low ability,” Dweck says.

This fallacy leads people to view set backs as personal failures rather than opportunities for growth.

Students for whom performance is paramount want to look smart even if it means not learning a thing in the process. For them, each task is a challenge to their self-image, and each setback becomes a personal threat.

Is Being Gifted Harmful?

As a person labeled ‘gifted’ as an adolescent, this article lead me to reflect on my own intellectual development.
Has being ‘gifted’ undermined my achievement? Possibly.

When you’re ‘gifted’ expectations change. Intelligence becomes your identity. Everyone knows you’re supposed to do well in school. When you don’t surpass other students with ease you feel like a failure.

Having your identity tarnished is very threatening.

If you do live up to expectations, you start to believe you really are gifted, and that your natural gifts will carry you to immense personal success. This leads to an inflated ego and underdeveloped work ethic.

Did this hurt me? It’s possible, but I wouldn’t want to use it as an excuse for personal shortcomings.

Still, I’m optimistic. At least I’ve realized that being ‘gifted’ doesn’t get you anywhere in the real world. That’s something they should teach in schools.