Don’t Wait To Be Inspired, Don’t Only Act On Passion

The feeling of being “inspired” is very often just finding something brilliant, and trying to emulate it. The rush and desire makes us manic and driven because we think we are actively becoming greater than ourselves. We find something we perceive as so great, we want others to perceive us – our take, our idea, our belief, our creation of it – similarly. But the foundation of that is what we are not. That’s why we have to find it, that’s why we run dry. It is not inherent or internal – at least the whirlwind, overwhelming kind of inspiration isn’t.

Acting without feeling inspired is us saying what we naturally know, feel and think, and this is vulnerability. When we believe that we must be inspired by an idea to create something of it, it is a mechanism to avoid placing ourselves bare into something that other people can judge.

The same goes for the idea of “passion.” Passion is the crazy, grandiose, brilliant idea for the epic novel, but it is not the every day work that gets it written. Ryan Holiday just wrote about this idea, in that Passion Is The Problem, Not The Solution.

Passion does not get the work done. Passion does not sustain you for more than a moment’s worth, neither does inspiration. It is not what gets your heads on the floor and your fingers on the keyboard and your mind in a space of determination. Please take my word for this.

But we’ve based most of our cultural aspirations on these ideas. That is to say, we’re supposed to choose what we feel consistently strongly about, and pursue it madly and wildly and at any cost. It’s why, I think, so many people feel lost. Because they don’t feel compelled by a single, conveniently-career-transmutable activity or idea (and most people aren’t supposed to… I have a hard time believing that “life purpose,” if it exists, is an isolated experience or job or action.)

You’ve probably heard (and read countless articles and studies) on why “following your passion” is the worst career advice you can get (“passion” is something you build; it’s what comes after you do something you enjoy repeatedly and gain skill and accolade, etc.) It’s not something that comes over you one day, at least not to any conceivable end.

But we don’t want to misstep. We want to base our decisions on something solid, on a singular purpose, on the truth gauge we’re promised we have. We are basing our life choices on feelings that other things give us, rather than the instincts we naturally have, and we’re calling that intuition.

There’s nothing wrong with the idea that you should do something each day that is fulfilling, but there is something dangerously misleading about the idea that you should feel passionately inspired each day (it insinuates there is no work, or rather, work shouldn’t feel like work.)

This makes happiness “good” and anything else “bad.” This makes the spectrum of emotions that human beings are meant to experience obsolete. This closes us off and stoppers our progress. This is how we induce our own suffering, by believing that the things that are “meant to be,” that are actions of passion and divine grandeur are going to make us feel consistently “good.”

If we were “meant” to feel good all the time, it wouldn’t be such a struggle. And we create that struggle for ourselves. Every time we look to something else to give us that high, we externalize our purpose. We step over vulnerability, we idealize a certain feeling, a certain job, a certain partner, and that’s it, it becomes the end goal, the only goal, the only way we’ll be content.

Passion is not what gets the job done. It is not what sustains a relationship or a career. Inspiration will not “find you” every single day. If you believe it’s supposed to, you’ll only be a failure in your own mind.

These things are drops, not constants. They are sparks, not flames.

You can prove this to yourself by the sheer fact that in retrospect, you probably realize you do not value the isolated moments of inspired thought as much as you do the work and love you consciously choose to put into them every single day to create something out of them. You value what you make, what you choose. Not what happens upon you.

What do you guys think about this article on passion and inspiration. Please let us know your thoughts and also share on your platforms too.

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35 Questions To Assist You In Finding Your Purpose

The potential of the average person is like a huge ocean unsailed, a new continent unexplored, a world of possibilities waiting to be released and channeled toward some great good.

BRIAN TRACY

Pinterest

1. What motivates or inspires you?

2. What do you do well naturally and effortlessly?

3. What is the one thing that you do that you always get positive feedback on?

4. What’s the one thing that’s missing in your current life and career?

5. Do you feel like what you’re doing right now is making you happy or bringing you closer to happiness?

6. If you didn’t have to worry about money, what would you really be doing?

7. What did you want to be when you were a kid? What was your childhood dream?

8. Who is your role model or who do you look up to when it comes to living a passionate or purposeful life? And what are they doing differently?

9. What do you want to be remembered for? What’s the message you want to leave behind?

10. What activities do you do that make you unaware of time and bring out the best in you?

11. What is the one thing that you won’t get tired of doing every day?

12. What would you do if you knew you wouldn’t fail?

13. Is fear the only thing holding you back from finding or living your calling?

14. How supportive are the people around you when it comes to living your passion?
15. Are you listening too much to them and ignoring your gut?

16. Do you believe you have what it takes to follow your passion?

17. If not, what are the tools you need to make you believe in yourself?

18. What is preventing you from following or finding you calling?

19. Are you confusing your job with your purpose?

20. What doesn’t feel like work to you?

21. What do people tell you you’re
exceptional at?

22. What talent do you possess that you know sets you apart from everyone else?

23. Would you be able to downsize your expenses and lifestyle so you can truly do what you love?

24. Do you have friends or mentors who are living their calling? How did they do it?

25. Are you saying yes to opportunities and activities that you truly enjoy?

26. Are you connecting with people who are passionate about the same things you’re passionate about?

27. Are you reading books on how to make them happen?

28. Are you actively trying to research how to get started?

29. If you were to quit your job and follow you passion, do you have enough savings to survive for a few months?

30. If not, how can you save up more so you can focus on living your passion?

31. Are you asking for advice or guidance?

32. Are you working on improving your skills or talents so you can stand out?

33. Are you mentally prepared to face rejections or setbacks until you make it happen?

34. Are you willing to ignore the naysayers and be your own source of motivation and encouragement?

35. What’s the worst that could happen if you actually started living our passion?

Repost: Passion Vs Distraction

I couldn’t take my eye of this post, had to share with you guys. If possible repost too!!

Human brain has limitless capacity but needs rest for rejuvenation. People usually follow their hobbies to reduce stress and feel fresh.

The time you have for yourself is very important. You can utilize it efficiently while trying to eliminate fatigue.

Passion: you did+learned+enjoyed+feeling great.

Distraction: you did+learned+enjoyed+feeling regret.

In simple words, you enjoyed an act, found it useful and want to do again and again. This is passion.

On the other side, you enjoyed your act, want to do it frequently but every time you feel regretful for wastage of time. That means you are distracted by that work.

Hence, think about the result/lesson of your work and try to utilize your time in more interesting manner.