Inspiration · kindness · Love · Uncategorized

How We Can Use a Secular Holiday to Celebrate God’s Love: Valentine’s Day

There is no right or wrong way for Christians to conduct themselves on Valentine’s Day that is different from any other day of the year. There are, however, attitudes and actions that we should adopt in honor of the day of love.

You can find the internet littered with articles and entries on the origin of Valentine’s Day: who St. Valentine was, or if he inspired the holiday. Those are trivial details. As it is today, whether or not it was ever religious, Valentine’s Day is a secular holiday for which Hallmark sells a lot of greeting cards, candy stores sell a lot of chocolate, and florists sell a lot of bouquets.

It is not important that you support, condemn, or ignore the consumerism associated with Valentine’s Day. It is important, however, that we, as Christians, consider how and why we should celebrate Valentine’s Day rather than restrict our views to the romantic exploitation of the secular world.

Religion that is pure and undefiled before God, the Father, is this: to visit orphans and widows in their affliction, and to keep oneself unstained from the world. James 1:27.

On Valentine’s Day, if there is a void in someone’s life where love should be, that emptiness is magnified by expectation. Think about your widowed grandmother or your divorced uncle. Seek out those who don’t have a home or a family or those who are caught in a cycle of poor decisions. Take the time to express love to those who feel unlovable.

Be thankful in all circumstances. 1 Thessalonians 5:18.

Valentine’s Day is a reminder of how we have been loved and who has loved us. Let your parents and grandparents know that you are grateful to have them as examples of how to love your own children and spouse. Call your friends to tell them how much you appreciate the love you’ve shared through laughter, shopping sprees, Harry Potter marathons, and sleepovers. A faithful source of love is precious, and whether it is familial, platonic, or romantic, it has the capacity to inspire, encourage, and heal.

I have found the one whom my soul loves. Song of Solomon 3:4.

Celebrating Valentine’s Day with your significant other is not wrong. I hope that I have not given you that impression. Romantic love is a gift from God, and he wants us to revel in the love that He shows to us by giving us another person to know and love in a holy, intimate way. Yes, Valentine’s Day can be a cheesy time to celebrate your relationship. I say go ahead and cheese it up.

Too often, we ignore the opportunity to share Christ’s love through the simplest actions. Our faith sends us into the world to love unconditionally, but if we are not exhibiting that love, how are we going to make disciples in His name? Let Valentine’s Day serve as a reminder of God’s love and the command He has given us to show love to others.